fuckyeahmathandsciencetattoos:

Here’s my tattoo, it’s a function of love and is read as follows: the limit of love of x as x approaches C is equal to infinity. Meaning this is a function of love and as x approaches C (Chris) love reaches infinity. I love it and would like to here some feedback :)
  • Camera: iPad mini
  • Aperture: f/2.4
  • Exposure: 1/20th
  • Focal Length: 3mm

fuckyeahmathandsciencetattoos:

Here’s my tattoo, it’s a function of love and is read as follows: the limit of love of x as x approaches C is equal to infinity. Meaning this is a function of love and as x approaches C (Chris) love reaches infinity. I love it and would like to here some feedback :)

justcallmezazzy:

tested it today. graphs a perfect, beautiful heart.

justcallmezazzy:

tested it today. graphs a perfect, beautiful heart.

Reblogged from justcallmezazzy
Surprise kitty snuggles ❤️

Surprise kitty snuggles ❤️

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

Yeah, my inner life today is no richer than it was when I worked at Steak ‘n Shake.

I don’t think we should measure the value of a person’s professional life by whether they have esteemed or lucrative work. The best formulation of professional value I’ve come across is from Tim O’Reilly: “Do things that need doing.” 

Stocking shelves? Needs doing. Serving food? Needs doing. Collecting garbage? Needs doing. Editing wikipedia pages? Needs doing. Figuring out how to maximize fees on checking accounts? Doesn’t need doing. Engaging trolls on the Internet? Doesn’t need doing. Volunteering at animal shelters? Needs doing.

Ultimately, for me at least, the measure of work’s value is not expressed best by money or love. The question is whether something that needs to be done is getting done.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

Reblogged from fishingboatproceeds
This is getting out of hand.

This is getting out of hand.

If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones.

Jane Espenson (from interview with Advocate.com)\

I dunno how many which ways this needs to be said

(via alienswithankhs)

Thiiiiis. 

(Source: fluffymoalabear)

Reblogged from process-effect
What if ‘Game of Thrones’ were set in feudal Japan?

tastefullyoffensive:

Feeling old.

Fanboys Online by Scott DeWitt [tumblr | website | twitter]

Reblogged from telth

what is this?!

(Source: cbvsop)

Reblogged from acidcupcake

fuckingrecipes:

IF YOU IGNORE ALL THE MARKETING SHIT, THIS ACTUALLY PROVIDES SOME PRETTY GOOD INFO ON KNIVES AND KNIFE MAINTENANCE. 

As far as quality goes, Shun makes fairly good knives. 

 Wüsthof,  Zwilling, Victorinox Swiss Army and Ginsu have the longest-lasting knives, all with a lifetime guarantee.  Ginsu does have some corrosion problems on some of their knives (the blades discoloring or even rusting) 

I’d advise to buy knives individually, and never in a set, because the sets tend to give you a bunch of knives that no one uses in everyday practice, and even a professional chef would only rarely use.  Buying fewer knives also allows you to buy higher-quality blades.

The best forged knives cost about 60-100 dollars per knife, but you’ll be able to use that same blade for the rest of your fucking life. It’s like buying a goddamn sword. 

Reblogged from fuckingrecipes